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Transformative technologies for safely managed sanitation

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journal contribution
posted on 24.11.2016, 14:56 by M. Sohail (Khan), Sue Cavill, Oluwasola AfolabiOluwasola Afolabi
Some 2·4 billion people lack access to safe sanitation. The potential of new technologies to address this need in low- and middle-income countries has been under-addressed in research, programming and policy. Despite the global efforts to improve access to sanitation, there has been insufficient attention to the role of transformative technologies to respond to these needs. There is an urgent need for innovation, in particular for safe faecal sludge management, not least to secure its benefits for health and well-being. This paper provides a short review of evolving technologies that are being developed to treat human faecal sludge together with insights into the use and implications of such technologies. A case study on the toilet reinvented by Loughborough University is presented, which uses hydrothermal carbonisation processes. The paper concludes with essential considerations for guiding national policymakers, the private sector, sanitation programme implementers and donors focused on improving access to safely managed sanitation.middle-income countries has been under-addressed in research, programming and policy. Despite the global efforts to improve access to sanitation, there has been insufficient attention to the role of transformative technologies to respond to these needs. There is an urgent need for innovation, in particular for safe faecal sludge management, not least to secure its benefits for health and well-being. This paper provides a short review of evolving technologies that are being developed to treat human faecal sludge together with insights into the use and implications of such technologies. A case study on the toilet of Loughborough University is presented, which uses hydrothermal carbonisation processes. The paper concludes with essential considerations for guiding national policymakers, the private sector, sanitation programme implementers and donors focused on improving access to safely managed sanitation.

Funding

The authors acknowledge the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation for its funding to Loughborough University, in particular Dr Doulaye Kone and Dr Carl Hensman.

History

School

  • Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering

Research Unit

  • Water, Engineering and Development Centre (WEDC)

Published in

Municipal Engineer , Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers (London)

Citation

SOHAIL, M., CAVILL, S. and AFOLABI, O.O.D., 2017. Transformative technologies for safely managed sanitation. Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Municipal Engineer, 171 (2), pp.78-85.

Publisher

© ICE Publishing

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Acceptance date

25/10/2016

Publication date

2017

Notes

This paper was accepted for publication in the journal Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Municipal Engineer and the definitive published version is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1680/jmuen.16.00026

ISSN

1753-7789

Language

en

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