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Using the patient activation measure to examine the self-management support needs of a population of UK workers with long-term health conditions

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journal contribution
posted on 28.09.2021, 10:22 by Sally Hemming, Fehmidah MunirFehmidah Munir
Objectives
To examine differences in patient activation and self-management support needs in a population of UK workers with long-term health conditions.

Methods
Demographic, health and activation information were taken from the data of participants with long-term conditions, collected via an online cross-sectional survey of workers. The 13-item British patient activation measure measured workers knowledge, skills and confidence towards self-managing.

Results
Three hundred and seven workers with mental health, musculoskeletal and other conditions completed the patient activation measure. Mental health conditions were most prevalent (36.8%). Workers were higher activated, however workers with mental health conditions were significantly less activated (p = 0.006). Differences in activation by condition severity and age were revealed.

Discussion
This study provides insight to the activation of UK workers with long-term conditions. Whilst workers with mental health conditions need more training and education to self-manage, workers are variably activated indicating broader support needs. There is a gap for workplace self-management support. The patient activation measure is used in healthcare to improve people’s self-management and should be considered to be included in the workplace, and could form part of interventions to support workers self-management. More rigorous studies, including the patient activation measure, are needed to identify the best approaches to identifying workers self-management support needs.

Funding

The broader PhD study was financially funded by Thrings LLP, a UK legal services firm. The research was supported by the National Institute for Health Research, Leicester Biomedical Research Centre which is a partnership between University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Loughborough University and University of Leicester.

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

Chronic Illness

Publisher

SAGE Publications

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Rights holder

© The Authors

Publisher statement

This is an Open Access Article. It is published by SAGE under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence (CC BY 4.0). Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Acceptance date

05/08/2021

Publication date

2021-09-27

Copyright date

2021

ISSN

1742-3953

eISSN

1745-9206

Language

en

Depositor

Prof Fehmidah Munir. Deposit date: 27 September 2021