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Utilising human performance criteria and computer simulation to design a martial arts kicking robot with increased biofidelity

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posted on 18.06.2013, 14:02 by Felix Tsui, Matthew Pain
The rules and regulations of Taekwondo stipulate how the sport must be played and the necessary personal protective equipment. As such, personal protective equipment performance under controlled rigid drop-tests is also outlined. Unfortunately, these impacts do not replicate human loading effectively, making conclusions about their performance unknown. However, it may be possible to use human kinematic data to improve the biofidelity of current impactors, including a current single-segment martial arts kicking robot. Five martial artists performed a series of roundhouse kicks while reflective markers on the kicking leg and pelvis were used to track hip, knee, ankle and foot positions. Using specific single-segment martial arts kicking robot robot parameters, computer simulation was used to model a singlesegment martial arts kicking robot performance (1-SM) and to form a multi-segment, multi-joint model to match human kinematic data (3-SM). The 3-SM was found to produce similar kinematics to human performance while reducing the overall effective mass at impact, motor torque and stress concentration magnitudes in the leg when compared to the 1-SM. This study suggested that human performances could be used to improve current mechanical testing techniques without introducing much complexity to improve the external validity of protective equipment evaluation testing.

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Citation

TSUI, F. and PAIN, M.T.G., 2012. Utilising human performance criteria and computer simulation to design a martial arts kicking robot with increased biofidelity. Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers Part P - Journal of Sports Engineering and Technology, 226 (3-4), pp. 244-252.

Publisher

© Sage

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Publication date

2012

Notes

This article is closed access.

ISSN

1754-3371

Language

en

Usage metrics

Loughborough Publications

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