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Work is political: Distributive injustice as a mediating mechanism in the relationship between job insecurity and political cynicism

journal contribution
posted on 15.10.2021, 14:50 authored by Anahi Van Hootegem, Arno Van Hootegem, Eva SelenkoEva Selenko, Hans De Witte
The past two decades saw an increase in political populism, set against the backdrop of turbulent economic and political developments. This is associated with a rise in workers worrying about job loss as well as an increase in individuals holding politicians and politics in disrepute. This study investigates whether these two processes are linked. Being concerned about maintaining one's job may be related to the experience of distributive injustice, which reflects people's perception that they do not get what they deserve. These injustice perceptions may, consequently, bring about a cynical attitude towards the political system. Using three-wave longitudinal data in a sample of 857 British employees, we found that job insecurity was indeed indirectly related to feelings of political cynicism via the experience of distributive injustice. This study underscores the relevance of workplace experiences for the development of political (dis)engagement.

History

School

  • Business and Economics

Department

  • Business

Published in

Political Psychology

Volume

43

Issue

2

Pages

375 - 396

Publisher

Wiley

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Rights holder

© International Society of Political Psychology

Publisher statement

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Van Hootegem, A. ...et al., (2022). Work is political: Distributive injustice as a mediating mechanism in the relationship between job insecurity and political cynicism. Political Psychology, 43 (2), pp.375-396, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/pops.12766. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. This article may not be enhanced, enriched or otherwise transformed into a derivative work, without express permission from Wiley or by statutory rights under applicable legislation. Copyright notices must not be removed, obscured or modified. The article must be linked to Wiley’s version of record on Wiley Online Library and any embedding, framing or otherwise making available the article or pages thereof by third parties from platforms, services and websites other than Wiley Online Library must be prohibited.

Acceptance date

28/01/2021

Publication date

2021-05-26

Copyright date

2021

ISSN

0162-895X

eISSN

1467-9221

Language

en

Depositor

Dr Eva Selenko. Deposit date: 14 October 2021