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Impact of conversational demand on driver distraction

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posted on 25.04.2008 by Nikolaos Gkikas, John H. Richardson
This article concisely describes three experiments testing the effects of auditory/cognitive distraction deriving from levels of conversational demand. In the pilot study, 8 participants drove three simulated routes with and without the task of holding a conversation with the experimenter. In the pilot experiment, 8 participants drove three different virtual routes with and without conversing with the experimenter. In experiment 1, 24 participants drove one virtual route under three conditions: no interaction with the experimenter, holding an informal conversation and holding a conversation concerning issues at work. The same design was repeated in the second experiment, with the difference that the 12 participants were tested on the Lane Change Task (Mattes, 2003). The results suggest a significant effect for conversation on driver ability to control the vehicle laterally, as well as a differentiation between conversation topics.

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Citation

GKIKAS, N. and RICHARDSON, J., 2007. Impact of conversational demand on driver distraction. IN: Contemporary Ergonomics 2007 : Proceedings of the International Conference on Contemporary Ergonomics (CE2007), 17-19 April 2007, Nottingham, UK, pp. 115-120

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© Taylor & Francis

Publication date

2007

Notes

This conference paper was published in Contemporary Ergonomics 2007 [© Taylor & Francis] and the definitive version is available from: http://www.taylorandfrancis.co.uk/

ISBN

9780415436380;0415436389

Language

en

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