This anarchist thinker helps explain why we feel so driven to help each other through the coronavirus.pdf (206.25 kB)

This anarchist thinker helps explain why we feel so driven to help each other through the coronavirus crisis

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posted on 25.05.2021, 12:31 by Ruth KinnaRuth Kinna, Thomas SwannThomas Swann
Empty supermarket shelves and panicked government briefings have become the defining images of the coronavirus crisis. But the community response, however, may well be a more enduring feature. The virus and the enforcement of social isolation have sparked uncertainty and anxiety. But a range of local volunteer-run mutual aid networks have also emerged. Many of the people involved in these groups know that the term “mutual aid” was made famous by the 19th-century anarchist Peter Kropotkin. He used it to attack Social Darwinists who described nature as a competitive fight between self-interested individuals. “Survival of the fittest” became their catch phrase and was used to describe antagonistic relationships between people, races and states. This way of thinking normalised aggression as a natural response to scarcity.

History

School

  • Social Sciences and Humanities

Department

  • Politics and International Studies

Published in

The Conversation

Publisher

The Conversation

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Publisher statement

This is an Open Access Article. It is published by Elsevier under the Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivatives 4.0 Unported Licence (CC BY-ND). Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/4.0/

Publication date

2020-03-27

Language

en

Depositor

Dr Thomas Swann. Deposit date: 21 May 2021

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