counting_the_cost_of_uk_poverty.pdf (9.36 MB)

Counting the cost of UK poverty

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posted on 12.08.2016, 08:56 by Glen Bramley, Donald Hirsch, Mandy Littlewood, David Watkins
Part of the case for investing in programmes to reduce poverty is that it produces huge costs not just to those who experience it but to taxpayers who foot the bill for some of the consequences of poverty to society. In areas where poverty is high, public spending on things like health care, children's social services and criminal justice is increased. Moreover, people who have experienced poverty, especially in childhood, face disadvantages that reduce their chance of being in work and reduce their projected earnings when they do work, which means the Exchequer brings in less in taxes and pays out more in benefits. Counting these costs is not easy, but this report gives an estimate to illustrate that poverty costs the Exchequer huge amounts of money - amounting to £78 billion a year, or around four per cent of GDP.
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Funding

Joseph Rowntree Foundation

History

School

  • Social Sciences

Department

  • Communication, Media, Social and Policy Studies

Research Unit

  • Centre for Research in Social Policy (CRSP)

Citation

BRAMLEY, G. ... et al., 2016. Counting the cost of UK poverty. York: Joseph Rowntree Foundation, 92pp.

Publisher

Joseph Rowntree Foundation © Loughborough University

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Publication date

2016

Notes

This is an official report.

ISBN

9781910783702

Language

en

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