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Elasto-multi-body dynamics of internal combustion engines with thin-shell elastohydrodynamic journal bearings

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thesis
posted on 06.08.2018, 13:21 by Suresh Gupta
This thesis describes problems associated with noise and vibration concern in internal combustion engines as the result of a growing trend in the development of modern vehicular engines with high power to light weight ratios. There are a plethora of vibration concerns. These are owed to the increasing combustion forces in lean burn engines and the progressive use of materials of durable, but light-weight construction. The latter has come about as a result of a need to reduce the inertial imbalances. These features have resulted in achieving fuel efficiency. Although the primary aims in high output power and structural integrity have been largely achieved, these have culminated in an assortment of sources of noise and vibration, chiefly among them those associated with signature output of the combustion process. For the common four stroke engines, the contributory sources are at half-engine order multiples, referred to as engine "roughness". A holistic approach is to incorporate reduced engine roughness contributions as an integral part of engine design and development. The aim of this thesis is to create a methodology for fundamental design evaluation and analysis of engine dynamics, which comprises rigid body inertial dynamics of engine assembly, the elasto-dynamics of flexible and compliant components and applied and reactive forces in such a complex assembly. [Continues.]

History

School

  • Mechanical, Electrical and Manufacturing Engineering

Publisher

© Suresh Gupta

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Publication date

2002

Notes

A Doctoral Thesis. Submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the award of Doctor of Philosophy at Loughborough University.

Language

en

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