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Electronics in the on-line control of railway movements: quantitative aspects

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thesis
posted on 07.08.2018, 16:18 authored by Eduardo E. Gelbstein
The present thesis is concerned with a quantitative examination of the on-line control of railway movements and develops a mathematical technique for the evaluation of safety based on the use of Markov processes, illustrated with examples. In addition, the thesis presents a design methodology applicable to electronic safety systems. These systems are shown to be an essential element in the development of fully electronic railway signalling systems, as well as in the increased automation of railway movements. An analysis of the limits of automation of railway movements is described and discussed together with a possible system configuration for the achievement of crewless train operation. The research described herein has been carried out at the British Railways R & D division and the methods described have been successfully applied to real engineering problems. The industrial R & D background of the present thesis is also reflected in the inclusion of a section on the socio-economic consequences of major innovation, particularly in the field of automation and in the consideration of costs and benefits. Section 2 contains an approach evolved jointly with Mr. W.T. Parkman, also at the R & D Division of British Railways, and has been published as Reference 16. Section 5 is a short description or the work carried out by the group under the direct responsibility of the author at the R & D Division of British Railways.

History

School

  • Mechanical, Electrical and Manufacturing Engineering

Publisher

© Eduardo Enriqué Gelbstein

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Publication date

1975

Notes

A Doctoral Thesis. Submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the award of Doctor of Philosophy at Loughborough University.

Language

en

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