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Identification of robotic manipulators' inverse dynamics coefficients via model-based adaptive networks

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posted on 02.05.2018, 14:09 by Robert J. Hay
The values of a given manipulator's dynamics coefficients need to be accurately identified in order to employ model-based algorithms in the control of its motion. This thesis details the development of a novel form of adaptive network which is capable of accurately learning the coefficients of systems, such as manipulator inverse dynamics, where the algebraic form is known but the coefficients' values are not. Empirical motion data from a pair of PUMA 560s has been processed by the Context-Sensitive Linear Combiner (CSLC) network developed, and the coefficients of their inverse dynamics identified. The resultant precision of control is shown to be superior to that achieved from employing dynamics coefficients derived from direct measurement. As part of the development of the CSLC network, the process of network learning is examined. This analysis reveals that current network architectures for processing analogue output systems with high input order are highly unlikely to produce solutions that are good estimates throughout the entire problem space. In contrast, the CSLC network is shown to generalise intrinsically as a result of its structure, whilst its training is greatly simplified by the presence of only one minima in the network's error hypersurface. Furthermore, a fine-tuning algorithm for network training is presented which takes advantage of the CSLC network's single adaptive layer structure and does not rely upon gradient descent of the network error hypersurface, which commonly slows the later stages of network training.

History

School

  • Mechanical, Electrical and Manufacturing Engineering

Publisher

© R.J. Hay

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Publication date

1998

Notes

A Doctoral Thesis. Submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the award of Doctor of Philosophy at Loughborough University.

Language

en

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