Thesis-2008-Platten.pdf (17.5 MB)

Individual differences in daytime sleepiness after night sleep extension versus afternoon napping and caffeine

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thesis
posted on 08.10.2018 by Charlotte Platten
Recent research has suggested that 7.5h sleep a night may not be sufficient to maintain adequate levels of alertness during the day. Two of the main arguments used in support of this theory are the ease with which many individuals fall asleep during the day and the ability of many to extend their nocturnal sleep length on demand. The first argument has been used to indicate an elevated level of daytime sleepiness, which may lead to decrements in performance throughout the waking day. The second argument uses the concept that all sleep is as a result of a physiological need, and so the ability to obtain additional sleep could indicate the repayment of a previous sleep debt. The first part of this thesis addresses the benefit of nocturnal sleep extension in terms of objective and subjective sleepiness in a group of young, healthy adults. [Continues.]

Funding

Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC).

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Publisher

© Charlotte R. Platten

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Publication date

2008

Notes

A Doctoral Thesis. Submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the award of Doctor of Philosophy at Loughborough University.

Language

en

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