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Some interactions between personality and differing strategies of instruction, with special reference to employment rehabilitation

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thesis
posted on 02.08.2018, 10:10 authored by Rudolf Dallos
The thesis is generally concerned with the exploration of individual differences in learning. Particular emphasis is placed upon the examination of the effects of personality factors on learning achievement from different.teaching strategies. First the relevant literature and prevalent theories were reviewed. This analysis suggested that the factors anxiety and intelligence are of paramount importance for an explanation of learning differences. However the evidence also indicated a need to examine the interactions between these factors and their relationship to teaching strategies. It was discerned that the teaching strategies which had been employed varied from predominantly discovery to predominantly reception. Consequently these two extremes were chosen for experimental comparison and analysis. The general impressions gained from the literature were supported by the results of two preliminary studies. The first of these dealt with the production and evaluation of a computer assisted teaching programme, and the second with the creation of a training scheme. The scheme involved analysis of learning tasks according to types of learning strategy combined with data on individual differences to produce Instructional Strategy Templates (I.S.T.s) as a basis for selecting appropriate teaching strategies for various types of task. [Continues.]

History

School

  • Social Sciences

Department

  • Communication, Media, Social and Policy Studies

Publisher

© Rudolf Dallos

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Publication date

1976

Notes

A Doctoral Thesis. Submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the award of Doctor of Philosophy at Loughborough University.

Language

en