Effect of geometrical and material imperfections on damping flexural vibrations in plates with attached wedges of power law profile

In the present paper, an efficient method of damping structural vibrations using the acoustic black hole effect is further investigated experimentally. This method is based on some specific properties of flexural wave propagation in tapered plates (wedges) of power-law profile that have to be partially covered by narrow thin strips of absorbing layers. Ideally, if the power-law exponent of the profile is equal or larger than two, the flexural wave never reaches the sharp edge and therefore never reflects back, which constitutes the acoustic black hole effect. It has been previously established theoretically and confirmed experimentally that this method of damping structural vibrations is very efficient even in the presence of edge truncations. The present work describes the results of the experimental studies of the effects of manufacturing intolerances on damping flexural vibrations in wedge-like structures of power-law profile. In particular, the effect of mechanical damage resulting from the use of cutting tools to wedge tips is investigated, including tip curling and early truncation, as well as the placement of absorbing layers on different wedge surfaces. Also, the effects of welded and glued bonding of wedge attachments to basic rectangular plates (strips) are investigated. The results show that, although the above-mentioned geometrical and material imperfections reduce the damping efficiency by varying degrees, the method of damping structural vibrations using the acoustic black hole effect is robust enough and can be used widely without the need of high precision manufacturing