Aziparte_psp2399-sup-0001-appendix_s1.docx (557.79 kB)

Supplementary Information Files for Socio-economic groups moving apart: An analysis of recent trends in residential segregation in Australia's main capital cities

Download (557.79 kB)
dataset
posted on 19.08.2021, 13:04 by Fran AzpitarteFran Azpitarte, O Alonso-Villar, F Hugo-Rojas
Supplementary Information Files for Socio-economic groups moving apart: An analysis of recent trends in residential segregation in Australia's main capital cities
We study changes in the spatial distribution and segregation of socio-economic groups in Australia using a new data set with harmonised census data for 1991 and 2011. We find a general increase in residential segregation by education and occupation groups across the major capital cities in Australia. Importantly, these trends cannot be explained in general by changes in the demographic structure of groups and areas but rather by the rise in the over and underrepresentation of groups across areas. In particular, our analysis reveals clear diverging trends in the spatial configuration of high and low socio-economic groups as measured by their occupation and education. Whereas high-skilled groups became more concentrated in the inner parts of cities, the low-educated and those working in low-status occupations became increasingly overrepresented in outer areas. This pattern is observed in all five major capital cities, but it is especially marked in Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane.

Funding

Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad. Grant Number: ECO2017-82241-R

Brotherhood of St Laurence; University of Melbourne;

Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Children and Families. Grant Number: CE140100027

Xunta de Galicia, Grant/Award Number: ED431B2019/34

Fondo Europeo de Desarrollo Regional, Grant/Award Number: ECO2017-82241-R

Agencia Estatal de Investigación

History

School

  • Social Sciences and Humanities

Department

  • Criminology, Sociology and Social Policy